tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-83660150659457336872021-12-31T21:05:24.114+00:00Ruffled FeathersSome of the results, achievements and highlights of the Mid-Wales Ringing GroupTony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.comBlogger494125tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-65287200873322438252021-11-08T13:50:00.002+00:002021-11-08T13:57:43.358+00:00European Curlew Connections<p><span style="font-family: arial;">Well we might have ill-advisedly severed our close connections to Europe but our Curlews seem not to have done the same.</span></p><p><span style="font-family: arial;">Three recent sightings have highlighted, once again, the vital need for cross-border conservation initiatives when dealing with species such as the Curlew. It is well-known that our breeding population is supplemented each winter by large numbers of birds seeking refuge from colder climes in Scandinavia, Poland, Germany, Russia and elsewhere in Northern Europe. It is less well known that, whilst most just move to southern Britain or Ireland for the winter, some of our breeding birds also move to warmer countries a bit further south.&nbsp;</span></p><p><span style="font-family: arial;">Yellow FW, a bird that regularly winters at Petit Port, Jersey has now returned for the 5th winter in succession.Yellow ZB a breeding male from the Shropshire part of the Curlew Country area was reported in Northern France in July (see earlier post <a href="https://midwalesringers.blogspot.com/2021/07/curlew-la-la.html" target="_blank">Curlew là là</a>) and now Yellow XC, an adult female ringed at a newly created wader scrape in the Curlew Country area, has been photographed <span>near Santander - no not the one in Welshpool High Street, the one in Northern Spain! According to the BTOs current Online Ringing and Recovery Reports&nbsp;<a href="https://www.bto.org/our-science/projects/ringing/publications/online-ringing-reports" target="_blank">BTO online-ringing-reports</a>&nbsp;</span><span>this is only the fifth reported record of a British-ringed Curlew in Spain.</span></span></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-q73_5Sd27Ys/YYkkciksuRI/AAAAAAAAD4c/nJqX0T2c7AYx5biG0vl-w9jhM6BM_2M4QCLcBGAsYHQ/s832/zara%2Bani%2Bama%2B%25282%2529.JPG" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><img border="0" data-original-height="626" data-original-width="832" height="482" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-q73_5Sd27Ys/YYkkciksuRI/AAAAAAAAD4c/nJqX0T2c7AYx5biG0vl-w9jhM6BM_2M4QCLcBGAsYHQ/w640-h482/zara%2Bani%2Bama%2B%25282%2529.JPG" width="640" /></span></a></div><p style="text-align: center;"><i><span style="font-family: arial; font-size: x-small;">Curlew XC photographed by&nbsp;<span>Ernesto Villodas on the&nbsp;</span><span>Santoña marshes in Northern Spain</span></span></i></p><p style="text-align: center;"><i><span style="font-family: arial;"><span style="font-size: 16px;"><br /></span></span></i></p><p style="text-align: center;"><i><span style="font-family: arial;"></span></i></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><i><span style="font-family: arial;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-WPwDhsgX_Cc/YYkqo0uku-I/AAAAAAAAD4s/yDJpcEVmeb80kRJhppe4KhkfVULuYTsCACLcBGAsYHQ/s1150/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-11-08%2Bat%2B13.47.51.png" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1150" data-original-width="895" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-WPwDhsgX_Cc/YYkqo0uku-I/AAAAAAAAD4s/yDJpcEVmeb80kRJhppe4KhkfVULuYTsCACLcBGAsYHQ/w498-h640/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-11-08%2Bat%2B13.47.51.png" width="498" /></a></span></i></div><i><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><br /><span style="font-size: 16px;"><br /></span></span></i><p></p>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-21431901462962487352021-09-30T12:03:00.000+01:002021-09-30T12:03:48.369+01:00Pushing boundaries<p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">Since the formation of the Mid Wales Ringing Group (and the start of the Dunlin colour-ringing project) in 2016 we have individually colour-marked over 6,000 Dunlin. The colour-marking has massively improved the recovery rate of our marked Dunlin and so far we have had over 450 sightings from a wide geographical area. Two recent sightings though have greatly extended the boundary of the area that Ynyslas Dunlin are know to either come from or go to. Olivier Gilg recently informed us of the sighting of LP0, a Dunlin ringed by Paul and Silvia on 23rd August 2020, seen on territory in NE Greenland (where it was being attacked by a breeding Sabine's Gull!). &nbsp;</span></p><p><span style="font-family: arial;"></span></p><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Lm_MYcZUi8s/YVWMV7cIa0I/AAAAAAAAD34/fFKk5eqQDzAOuKfdKFoMRSXxKSxII_X-gCLcBGAsYHQ/s2048/Dunlin%2BLP0%2BM%2BA%2BForin-Wiart%2BGREA.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1496" data-original-width="2048" height="468" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Lm_MYcZUi8s/YVWMV7cIa0I/AAAAAAAAD34/fFKk5eqQDzAOuKfdKFoMRSXxKSxII_X-gCLcBGAsYHQ/w640-h468/Dunlin%2BLP0%2BM%2BA%2BForin-Wiart%2BGREA.jpg" width="640" /></span></a></div><span style="font-family: arial;"><div style="text-align: justify;"><br /></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><i>Ynyslas Dunlin on breeding ground in NE Greenland image ©&nbsp;<span style="font-family: Helvetica; text-align: left;">M.-A. Forin-Wiart/GREA</span></i></span></div></span><span style="font-family: arial;"><div style="text-align: justify;"><br /></div><div style="text-align: justify;">We also recently heard from Arnold Kristjuhan informing us of a sighting of NH5 (a bird ringed by me on 18th October 2020 in front of the Pillbox on the Dyfi salt marsh whilst trying to catch Curlews for the ECHOES project <a href="https://echoesproj.eu" target="_blank">echoesproj.eu</a>) at Tareste, Hiiumaa, Estonia. These two records greatly extend the northern and eastern limits for our Dunlin recoveries so far. The furthest south an Ynyslas Dunlin has so far been recorded is at Pirang Shrimp Farm in the Gambia.</div></span><p></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;"></span></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Cgxtd_XJlnE/YVWUUukQ5KI/AAAAAAAAD4A/nKniUTXb4sUq3le4sEAhLJsojjRCa436wCLcBGAsYHQ/s1098/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-09-30%2Bat%2B10.56.32.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1098" data-original-width="790" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Cgxtd_XJlnE/YVWUUukQ5KI/AAAAAAAAD4A/nKniUTXb4sUq3le4sEAhLJsojjRCa436wCLcBGAsYHQ/w460-h640/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-09-30%2Bat%2B10.56.32.png" width="460" /></a></span></div><span style="font-family: arial;"><br />Of the 450+ sightings submitted so far, foreign movements of Dunlin to or from Ynyslas have included&nbsp;Greenland (3), Iceland (4), Faero Islands (1), Norway (3), Sweden (5), Finland (2), Estonia (1), Denmark (4), Germany (4), Poland (2), Republic of Ireland (23), The Netherlands (5), France (30), Switzerland (1), Spain (62), Portugal (15), Canary Islands (2), Morocco (2), Mauritania (124), Senegal (1) and The Gambia (1)</span><p></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial; font-size: x-small;"><i>&nbsp;(NB these totals may contain more than one sighting of the same individual)</i></span></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">So next time you see a flock of Dunlin, and rapidly ignore them in search of something more exciting, take a moment to think that in the summer some of those birds may have spent their time dodging Sabine's Gulls, Arctic foxes and even Polar Bears and may be heading off to spend the winter dodging Black Kites, Jackals and Crocodiles, it's amazing really that there are still so many of them!</span></p>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-28284568904460799612021-09-24T21:36:00.000+01:002021-09-24T21:36:46.970+01:00New Colour-ring Reporter App<p></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-JHmvtjjBu2I/YU40nhqRk0I/AAAAAAAAD3o/ygt-cxBqASovJhmC8RJabKiLmJEB4u8TgCLcBGAsYHQ/s2020/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-09-24%2Bat%2B21.25.01.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1259" data-original-width="2020" height="398" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-JHmvtjjBu2I/YU40nhqRk0I/AAAAAAAAD3o/ygt-cxBqASovJhmC8RJabKiLmJEB4u8TgCLcBGAsYHQ/w640-h398/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-09-24%2Bat%2B21.25.01.png" width="640" /></a></div><br />&nbsp;<p></p><p>Thanks to the IT skills of Stephen Vickers we now have an automated colour-ring reporter app. If you click the link on the top right of the website you will see the above screen and there you can input your sightings of any of our colour-ringed birds. The app will then generate an immediate output detailing the ringing information and any subsequent re-sightings. I hope you like this exciting new development and that this may encourage a few more birders to submit their colour-ring sightings directly (in return for instant gratification!).</p>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-52678436084900787442021-09-15T17:57:00.002+01:002021-09-15T18:08:33.902+01:00Where do you think you're going?<p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;"></span></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-eVPilwJu_0k/YUIlRqKUpZI/AAAAAAAAD3Q/vrJ8k1nnAhgBSejbUa6L-nyY6mDUUV0SACLcBGAsYHQ/s1720/Rattray%2BKes.jpg" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1146" data-original-width="1720" height="426" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-eVPilwJu_0k/YUIlRqKUpZI/AAAAAAAAD3Q/vrJ8k1nnAhgBSejbUa6L-nyY6mDUUV0SACLcBGAsYHQ/w640-h426/Rattray%2BKes.jpg" width="640" /></a></span></div><span style="font-family: arial;"><div><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span></div><i><span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></i></span><i><span style="font-size: x-small;">Photo by Alex Jamieson</span></i><div><span style="font-family: arial;"><i><br /></i>An email popped into my inbox today with details of a sighting of a young Kestrel, ringed earlier this year in one of Red Liford's nest boxes near Lledrod in Ceredigion. Given the location and the distance of the sighting I was a bit sceptical that the report was correct but, if it was, wanted to post something on the blog. I sent the finder an email to see if they had any photos of the bird and thankfully, not only did they have photos but several (not posted here) confirmed, without any doubt, that the bird in question was one that we had ringed and was not one from another scheme with similar rings. It was photographed (looking very sorry for itself) in heavy rain on Rattray Lighthouse in Aberdeenshire, just over 600km NNE of where it had hatched!</span><p></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;"></span></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-JCPxs5TcSMQ/YUIkJbQRZ6I/AAAAAAAAD3I/gi4LHXunADgjd2hRlgA_oM7YieKgiOijQCLcBGAsYHQ/s1189/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-09-15%2Bat%2B17.46.30.png" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1189" data-original-width="941" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-JCPxs5TcSMQ/YUIkJbQRZ6I/AAAAAAAAD3I/gi4LHXunADgjd2hRlgA_oM7YieKgiOijQCLcBGAsYHQ/w506-h640/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-09-15%2Bat%2B17.46.30.png" width="506" /></a></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span></div><span style="font-family: arial;">We get disappointingly few records of our ringed Kestrels but since colour-ringing started we have had recoveries from West Yorkshire, Cheshire, Shropshire, Gloucester, Wiltshire, Suffolk and even Spain. This current movement to North Scotland is totally unexpected and unprecedented.&nbsp;</span><p></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">I really hope the bird in question survives and in a way I hope it doesn't attempt the return journey, at least not until we get some better weather next year.</span></p></div>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-23781761815647467772021-08-30T13:17:00.001+01:002021-08-30T13:17:45.841+01:00Curlew chick releases<p></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-SMcnb8IxD8I/YSzKXqWwQNI/AAAAAAAAD24/qW3n8Om-lNMzFJTxNm5_Oc0UvncSwHcrACLcBGAsYHQ/s1041/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-08-30%2Bat%2B13.08.20.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="608" data-original-width="1041" height="374" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-SMcnb8IxD8I/YSzKXqWwQNI/AAAAAAAAD24/qW3n8Om-lNMzFJTxNm5_Oc0UvncSwHcrACLcBGAsYHQ/w640-h374/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-08-30%2Bat%2B13.08.20.png" width="640" /></a></div><br /><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">For the past few years I have been working for Curlew Country on the Shropshire/Powys border trying to help maintain the small, remnant, lowland Curlew population there. In the initial years our attention was spent trying to collect information on what exactly were the problems and how we might alleviate them. Quite rapidly it became apparent that the problems were major and that drastic action was needed. In 2017 we pioneered Curlew headstarting, taking eggs from nests with low probability of success, and rearing chicks in captivity to the point of fledge and then releasing into suitable natural habitat. This year, after an enforced break in 2020 due to Covid, we released another 33 young Curlews, making a total of nearly 100 since we began. The link below shows some moving images of the release of the second batch of chicks in 2021&nbsp;</span></div><p></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><a href="https://youtu.be/yyVThb73KL4">https://youtu.be/yyVThb73KL4</a>&nbsp;</span></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">Hopefully some of these birds will return to breed and help keep the iconic bubbling song of the curlew a feature of the Welsh Marches. Please keep yours eyes peeled for colour-rings on any Curlew you may see anywhere and report, it may even be one of those shown in this video!</span></p>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-45324247220027224382021-08-13T13:59:00.001+01:002021-08-13T14:03:01.964+01:00First and Fortunate 2<p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">Over the last 20 odd years records of Hobby in summer have increased in Ceredigion. Tregaron Bog and Borth Bog have been favoured sites as the birds hunt the plentiful supplies of dragonflies. More random sightings in farmland have hinted at breeding birds becoming established and breeding was confirmed for the first time in the county just a few years ago.&nbsp;</span></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">A couple of days back, I was contacted by a friend and ex 'C' ringer of mine to say he had a pair of Hobby nesting not far from his house and did I have a schedule 1 licence to ring them? Well, fortunately, I do, so yesterday, having obtained the landowner's permission Silvia and I went over to check the nest and see if it was safely accessible.&nbsp;</span></p><p></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Js79hXoWvfg/YRZlWa6RutI/AAAAAAAAD10/IrhJ5qPwANEOBehe-QqNikYujPLC9QmqQCLcBGAsYHQ/s1228/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-08-13%2Bat%2B13.27.31.png" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1228" data-original-width="916" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Js79hXoWvfg/YRZlWa6RutI/AAAAAAAAD10/IrhJ5qPwANEOBehe-QqNikYujPLC9QmqQCLcBGAsYHQ/w478-h640/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-08-13%2Bat%2B13.27.31.png" width="478" /></span></a></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">The birds were breeding about 30ft up in an old Carrion Crow's nest in a hedgerow oak, still well within my rapidly diminishing capabilities! &nbsp;A few throws of the rope and 10 minutes later the chicks were safely on the ground but for one of them the visit was quite literally life-saving. The younger male chick had managed to get his leg badly entangled in the veritable spider's web of baler twine that the crow's had brought in as nest lining.&nbsp;</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-yJ0xffCllnQ/YRZp0zHPPFI/AAAAAAAAD2E/U6DSTBTxv84P9a_gz0gQySPft_1YBab7ACLcBGAsYHQ/s475/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-08-13%2Bat%2B13.46.23.png" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="475" data-original-width="356" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-yJ0xffCllnQ/YRZp0zHPPFI/AAAAAAAAD2E/U6DSTBTxv84P9a_gz0gQySPft_1YBab7ACLcBGAsYHQ/w480-h640/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-08-13%2Bat%2B13.46.23.png" width="480" /></a></div><br /><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">His foot was quite swollen and the leg itself a bit 'pinched' but once the twine had been cut away it rapidly improved with the swelling disappearing almost instantly and the foot becoming a bit more normal in colour.&nbsp;</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-eaScFEq_37U/YRZp0-AXMvI/AAAAAAAAD2I/8Oi9VLfyqg4ssfycdvKrhatoL39vhAy6ACLcBGAsYHQ/s1624/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-08-13%2Bat%2B13.42.03.png" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1222" data-original-width="1624" height="482" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-eaScFEq_37U/YRZp0-AXMvI/AAAAAAAAD2I/8Oi9VLfyqg4ssfycdvKrhatoL39vhAy6ACLcBGAsYHQ/w640-h482/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-08-13%2Bat%2B13.42.03.png" width="640" /></a></div></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">Without our intervention this chick would have died a slow and miserable death as the adults would eventually have been forced to abandon it and it would have starved, unable to leave the nest. As it is it appears that being restricted in movement has led to him developing less quickly than his female brood-mate.</span></div><p></p><p style="text-align: justify;"></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-bp00Aj-ivtA/YRZqLez0BfI/AAAAAAAAD2g/WBDjzwR1B-QwRvnBMPDzlsIqS8qUXX-gQCLcBGAsYHQ/s1040/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-08-13%2Bat%2B13.45.53.png" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="781" data-original-width="1040" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-bp00Aj-ivtA/YRZqLez0BfI/AAAAAAAAD2g/WBDjzwR1B-QwRvnBMPDzlsIqS8qUXX-gQCLcBGAsYHQ/w640-h480/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-08-13%2Bat%2B13.45.53.png" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: arial;"><p style="text-align: justify;"></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-C_CpSkdVJEc/YRZsgCgE6GI/AAAAAAAAD2s/Twen2mu8KFoA7ksMEgYcRkJ_LZdk2hEWgCLcBGAsYHQ/s946/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-08-13%2Bat%2B13.58.08.png" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="946" data-original-width="461" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-C_CpSkdVJEc/YRZsgCgE6GI/AAAAAAAAD2s/Twen2mu8KFoA7ksMEgYcRkJ_LZdk2hEWgCLcBGAsYHQ/w312-h640/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-08-13%2Bat%2B13.58.08.png" width="312" /></a></div><br /><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span><p></p>As far as I am aware these are the first two Hobby pulli ever ringed in Ceredigion and they may be only the second and third Hobby ever ringed in the county. We were fortunate enough to catch one "accidentally" on Both Bog a few years ago as it pursued a Cuckoo across the reedbed.</span><p></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">Both chicks were colour-ringed so we look forward to receiving sightings of them in the future, hopefully settling locally and expanding our breeding population of this&nbsp;stunning little falcon.</span></p><p><br /></p><p><br /></p>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com3tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-87006610414062151652021-07-21T18:43:00.000+01:002021-07-21T18:43:47.013+01:00Curlew là là<p>&nbsp;</p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-zbgoCNsVznc/YPhUGzEpoSI/AAAAAAAAD1A/toJAEzCtnEIFsqIWreGSq7CWWyYdgj5jACLcBGAsYHQ/s458/ad841b44-9f7e-47ad-81a3-5e720256d5fd.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="309" data-original-width="458" height="432" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-zbgoCNsVznc/YPhUGzEpoSI/AAAAAAAAD1A/toJAEzCtnEIFsqIWreGSq7CWWyYdgj5jACLcBGAsYHQ/w640-h432/ad841b44-9f7e-47ad-81a3-5e720256d5fd.jpg" width="640" /></a></div><br /><p></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">On 10th July 2021 Pierre Leon photographed Curlew Yellow ZB on the shore of Plage du Vogue, Guisseny, &nbsp;France. This bird was caught and ringed in the breeding season at one of the Curlew Country breeding territories using a whoosh net and decoy. This is highly significant as it provides yet more confirmation that some of our breeding Curlews winter in, or pass through, France, where, until recently Curlew was still a legal quarry species and where as recently as 2019 there was an intention to set a 'sustainable' harvest limit of 6,000 birds! Thankfully, due to widespread international outcry, the decision was amended and the bag limit was set to zero for the 2019/2020 hunting season. Hopefully, international pressure will continue and those birds from our rapidly declining breeding population that choose to move to France for the winter can do so in relative safety.</span></p><p></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-VBxXm7e11ME/YPhXMKF_13I/AAAAAAAAD1I/mMSv9OkAmDUVIPwoxkKjWXEcZt5MbnKNwCLcBGAsYHQ/s1150/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-07-21%2Bat%2B18.19.05.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="997" data-original-width="1150" height="554" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-VBxXm7e11ME/YPhXMKF_13I/AAAAAAAAD1I/mMSv9OkAmDUVIPwoxkKjWXEcZt5MbnKNwCLcBGAsYHQ/w640-h554/Screen%2BShot%2B2021-07-21%2Bat%2B18.19.05.png" width="640" /></a></div><br /><p></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><i><span style="font-family: arial;">Yellow ZB either wintering or staging at Guisseny in northern France in mid-July just over 450 kms from Shropshire where he had attempted (and presumably failed) to breed.</span></i></p><p><br /></p>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-74541618760911059632021-03-19T11:24:00.000+00:002021-03-19T11:24:45.013+00:00We're Knot flagging!<div><span style="font-family: arial;">Last year we started two new colour-ringed projects putting leg-flags on Knot and Turnstone. The Turnstone ringing has yet to yield many resightings but the Knot flagging is already proving very rewarding. Here is an update of re-sightings so far.</span></div><div><br /></div><div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-yEKA4nUlXok/YFSEOkwDz7I/AAAAAAAADyA/52OR9AL8RLQpW4hLVKHANRXVCcYwVvO3gCLcBGAsYHQ/s2048/IMG_1256.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="2048" data-original-width="1536" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-yEKA4nUlXok/YFSEOkwDz7I/AAAAAAAADyA/52OR9AL8RLQpW4hLVKHANRXVCcYwVvO3gCLcBGAsYHQ/w480-h640/IMG_1256.jpg" width="480" /></a></div><br /><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">The Knot flagging project is being done in collaboration with Jim Wilson of the International Wader Study Group and Peter Knight and Rose Maciewicz of Leeds University. Since the scheme began, a total of 70 Knot have been leg-flagged at Ynyslas and, of these, 14 have been re-sighted away from Ynyslas, several on multiple occasions. This is a huge improvement on the results obtained by BTO metal ringing alone where we have previously had just two recoveries from over 350 knot ringed.</span></div></div><div><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span></div><div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial; text-align: left;">To date most of the recoveries have come from the UK but have also included birds re-sighted in Ireland, France, Belgium and Portugal.&nbsp;</span></div></div><div><br /></div> <iframe height="480" src="https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=1NRgIU0MYcOxBgVSOwXyKKB-vajG6kaT2" width="640"></iframe><div> <div style="text-align: center;"><i><br /></i></div><div style="text-align: center;"><i><span style="font-family: arial;">Knot re-sightings 20/21. Click on individual icon to see details</span></i></div></div><div style="text-align: center;"><i><br /></i></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><i><br /></i></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">The Portuguese re-sighting is very significant as its location would indicate that the bird was of the race <i>Calidris&nbsp;canutus&nbsp;canutus</i> from Siberia which winters in West Africa. This race has very few (if any) confirmed records for Wales (although it must surely be present quite frequently on autumn passage?).</span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Fib0uC4Yvqc/YFSHKh21RzI/AAAAAAAADyI/X2pyauWTVc0IRZO8AT5ySwVUeyqS_qd2gCLcBGAsYHQ/s1643/DSCN1752.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1095" data-original-width="1643" height="266" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Fib0uC4Yvqc/YFSHKh21RzI/AAAAAAAADyI/X2pyauWTVc0IRZO8AT5ySwVUeyqS_qd2gCLcBGAsYHQ/w400-h266/DSCN1752.JPG" width="400" /></a></div><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><i><span style="font-family: arial;">Ynyslas leg-flagged Knot (race canutus?) in Portugal. Unfortunately the individual could not be identified as it was not close enough to read the inscription on the flag.</span></i></div>Amy Moscrophttp://www.blogger.com/profile/02224721683018960091noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-56258092958098007672021-01-28T18:31:00.000+00:002021-01-28T18:31:49.452+00:00A Great Spot (for Woodpeckers)<div><span style="font-family: arial;">Posts on the blog have tailed off a bit in recent years as most of what we do is part of long-term projects, so can become a bit repetitive! Anyway, life has really changed now and anything we manage to do is a complete breath of fresh air (often literally!).</span></div><div><span style="font-family: arial;">&nbsp;<br /></span><span style="font-family: arial;">One thing I, like many other ringers, have been managing to do in lock-down, in line with guidance from BTO HQ, is ring in the garden. Normally I confine this to when the Siskins, Goldfinches and Redpolls are passing through on spring passage as I'm not massively keen on catching shed loads of local Blue Tits. This year though, bring on the Blue Tits!&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: arial;">There has been a surprising result to the increased garden netting in that, amazingly, this morning I managed to catch the 30th different Great Spotted Woodpecker on my garden feeders since April 2020 - where on earth are they all coming from?</span></div><div><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: arial;">Sadly,&nbsp;the really old one I caught just over 12 months ago, that was just a few months shy of the current British longevity record for the species, hasn't been one of them.</span></div><div><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span></div><div><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wJsX_uhhzhc/YBMCLNE1dCI/AAAAAAAADxA/s0WJMAH-cEM2D9UxRoUxpmq9BtgHboJNwCLcBGAsYHQ/s2048/IMG_1724.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="2048" data-original-width="1536" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wJsX_uhhzhc/YBMCLNE1dCI/AAAAAAAADxA/s0WJMAH-cEM2D9UxRoUxpmq9BtgHboJNwCLcBGAsYHQ/w480-h640/IMG_1724.jpg" width="480" /></a></div></div>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-38504963289985972942020-12-06T08:48:00.001+00:002020-12-06T08:48:37.834+00:00<p><span class="d2edcug0 hpfvmrgz qv66sw1b c1et5uql oi732d6d ik7dh3pa fgxwclzu a8c37x1j keod5gw0 nxhoafnm aigsh9s9 d3f4x2em fe6kdd0r mau55g9w c8b282yb iv3no6db jq4qci2q a3bd9o3v knj5qynh oo9gr5id" dir="auto">There are some nights when woodcock ringing is just hard work. Last night aided by Bethyn Thomas<span></span> and his Dad we saw 38 woodcock, but I could only catch 3. This was because it was very calm and the ground was frosty making a stealthy approach impossible. However there was a reward for our effort and kms walked, one of the three birds caught was a retrap of a woodcock I caught as a juvenile on the very same field eight years ago. This is my oldest retrap to date after catching 2400 woodcock over 12 years. This bird has made 17 migrations across of the North Sea. With an average migration of around 2000 km this individual has probably flown around 35,000 km in its life. I retrapped this bird in the autumn of 2012 and again in Jan 2014, but have not encountered it since. At time like this I dream how amazing it would be if woodcock could talk. </span></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Uijk2ekX1io/X8ya0EWV4zI/AAAAAAAAAc0/7jiyBpC9wZ8zpdJisk7EnRIemkvTQ5y-wCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/DSCF7501.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Uijk2ekX1io/X8ya0EWV4zI/AAAAAAAAAc0/7jiyBpC9wZ8zpdJisk7EnRIemkvTQ5y-wCLcBGAsYHQ/s320/DSCF7501.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="oajrlxb2 g5ia77u1 qu0x051f esr5mh6w e9989ue4 r7d6kgcz rq0escxv nhd2j8a9 nc684nl6 p7hjln8o kvgmc6g5 cxmmr5t8 oygrvhab hcukyx3x jb3vyjys rz4wbd8a qt6c0cv9 a8nywdso i1ao9s8h esuyzwwr f1sip0of lzcic4wl oo9gr5id gpro0wi8 lrazzd5p" role="button" tabindex="0"><br /></div><p></p>owen williamshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/06543990799125489066noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-30658232609077242712020-11-01T21:49:00.000+00:002020-11-01T21:49:10.212+00:00Egrets return<p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">I have recently received reports (and photographs) of two of our colour-ringed Little Egrets. Both birds were ringed on the same day (25th June 2012) over 8 years ago. The first (White T, Yellow A) photographed on Anglesey by Toby Carter has been reported about 10 times over the years all from Malltraeth Marsh at a maximum distance from the ringing site near Bangor of 19.5 kms.&nbsp;</span></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-m-QOgQM_M9c/X58leA8XbgI/AAAAAAAADv8/fjGYmHXer2IL1umTeW1rdbnL5JyFdlAOQCLcBGAsYHQ/s1080/White%2BT%2BYellow%2BA.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="862" data-original-width="1080" height="319" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-m-QOgQM_M9c/X58leA8XbgI/AAAAAAAADv8/fjGYmHXer2IL1umTeW1rdbnL5JyFdlAOQCLcBGAsYHQ/w400-h319/White%2BT%2BYellow%2BA.jpg" width="400" /></a></div><p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: arial; text-align: justify;"><i>Photo © Toby Carter</i></span></p><p><span style="font-family: arial; text-align: justify;">The second bird (White T, Yellow V) photographed at Llansteffan, Carmarthenshire by Mark Carter has only been reported twice previously but amazingly both time were at Playa Blanca, Lanzarote, Canary Islands. The first report was on 8th January 2014 and then again on 15th March 2020. At 2,824 kms, this is one of the longest movements ever recorded for a BTO-ringed Little Egret and mirrors an earlier movement of one of our Bangor-ringed birds to Tenerife. It would be amazing to know if this second bird has been making annual migrations down to the same wintering location on the Canaries (a round trip of over 5,000kms) or whether it suddenly decided to return after 8 years living the ex pat life (which seems highly unlikely!).</span></p><p></p><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-k8oJVeT9zpM/X58keb7yEhI/AAAAAAAADvw/RdP7qXYg4jMUxZ9UYhVR5NC85F5Rjdo4wCLcBGAsYHQ/s2048/20200906_085214.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1536" data-original-width="2048" height="300" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-k8oJVeT9zpM/X58keb7yEhI/AAAAAAAADvw/RdP7qXYg4jMUxZ9UYhVR5NC85F5Rjdo4wCLcBGAsYHQ/w400-h300/20200906_085214.jpg" width="400" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><i style="font-family: arial; text-align: justify;"><div style="text-align: center;"><i>Photo © Mark Carter</i></div></i><p></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-sAvBZayjVeM/X58r-X5gMwI/AAAAAAAADwI/Mi7pVOYqXZACioo3dSlzmO6bqgxAUPSmgCLcBGAsYHQ/s1136/Screen%2BShot%2B2020-11-01%2Bat%2B21.42.01.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1136" data-original-width="952" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-sAvBZayjVeM/X58r-X5gMwI/AAAAAAAADwI/Mi7pVOYqXZACioo3dSlzmO6bqgxAUPSmgCLcBGAsYHQ/w536-h640/Screen%2BShot%2B2020-11-01%2Bat%2B21.42.01.png" width="536" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><i>Ringing location of both birds shown by green marker. The top red marker shows the location of all of (White T, Yellow A)'s reported sightings and the bottom two red markers show those of (White T, Yellow V)</i></div></div><br />Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-32165281844937844352020-09-02T13:02:00.003+01:002020-09-02T13:12:45.880+01:00Sweet SA<p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">Last night was the first of the next set of high tides for ringing at Ynyslas. As the winds were light and conditions were right I decided to forgo wader dazzling in favour of mist-netting terns. On the last set of tides the estuary was brim-full of Sandwich Terns, Kittiwakes and a raft of other species but the winds were far too high to attempt any netting and unfortunately terns aren't really catchable by dazzling. Sod's law, conditions were now perfect but it was ominously quite on the tern front with nearly all having moved on! Still an opportunity to net terns is never missed even if there isn't much about. With assistance from Stephen Edwards and Gareth and Roy Richardson we set the usual 4 x 60ft wader nets on the point and waited. High tide was a bit early, such that there was no catching on the rising tide as it was too light and the nets were too visible. It did allow us to watch a juvenile Peregrine persistently terrorising the Dunlin (and seemingly inflicting needless damage as we caught four Dunlin with large rips in the skin of their breasts or sides).&nbsp;</span></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">Needless to say I was relieved when we eventually caught our first few terns (Sandwich and Common) along with a few Dunlin, Knot and a Turnstone. The Knot and Turnstone were particularly welcome as it enabled us to kick-start two new colour-marking projects using leg-flags on both species.&nbsp;</span></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-KPyMs5niUF0/X0-IY76813I/AAAAAAAADuc/sac9iR08eu4O8oXKtQ0bKJKaTUGZs0Q0gCLcBGAsYHQ/s2048/IMG_0990.jpg" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="2048" data-original-width="1536" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-KPyMs5niUF0/X0-IY76813I/AAAAAAAADuc/sac9iR08eu4O8oXKtQ0bKJKaTUGZs0Q0gCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/IMG_0990.jpg" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-F-fEsLIi4sE/X0-INRXX6sI/AAAAAAAADuY/JHNIlDgc6LMdZyPSbPBHYPdCLAg7noH6wCLcBGAsYHQ/s2048/IMG_0978.jpg" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1536" data-original-width="2048" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-F-fEsLIi4sE/X0-INRXX6sI/AAAAAAAADuY/JHNIlDgc6LMdZyPSbPBHYPdCLAg7noH6wCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/IMG_0978.jpg" width="640" /></a></div><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">We catch a reasonable number of both species annually but in the past have had very few returns from just BTO metal rings. Hopefully the leg-flags will enable birdwatchers to help us collect additional information and greatly increase the data on movements etc.</span></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">Just as we were finishing processing the last few birds Stephen returns from a net round with the exciting news of a foreign-ringed Common Tern. "Wow, that's nice" I say. The reply was "yes, and its a South African ring!"&nbsp;</span></p><p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial;">My reply is, not surprising to&nbsp;some, unrepeatable!!</span></p><p style="text-align: justify;"></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-HUm2wlMjsco/X0-Lzri-TGI/AAAAAAAADu4/pILLc2JF4AU9MzTA4BLJKQBFhNNVzadFQCLcBGAsYHQ/s2048/IMG_0003.jpeg" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1536" data-original-width="2048" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-HUm2wlMjsco/X0-Lzri-TGI/AAAAAAAADu4/pILLc2JF4AU9MzTA4BLJKQBFhNNVzadFQCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/IMG_0003.jpeg" width="640" /></a></div><br /><span style="font-family: arial;"><br /></span><p></p><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-KtW5T_BQBtA/X0-IpkkmJwI/AAAAAAAADus/n6T9nApiBasfiKtyJ3woaJcaNujv1hk0gCLcBGAsYHQ/s2048/IMG_0992.jpg" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1536" data-original-width="2048" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-KtW5T_BQBtA/X0-IpkkmJwI/AAAAAAAADus/n6T9nApiBasfiKtyJ3woaJcaNujv1hk0gCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/IMG_0992.jpg" width="640" /></a></div><br /><p><br /></p>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-51917594065617668752020-05-09T11:53:00.001+01:002020-05-09T15:49:48.690+01:00We can CU<div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">People call them "unprecedented times", I cannot possibly say what I call them!!</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">This year's planned Curlew work, along with so much else, has been shelved, just a small piece of the resulting worldwide data gap in long-term monitoring projects that we will never fill. It is, admittedly, a much smaller sacrifice than some have made and was necessary to help save lives but is a real and present pain in the proverbial all the same.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">One small saving grace, for us anyway, is that whilst maintaining all rules on social distancing and not putting anyone at increased risk we have just managed to install Curlew Cam on another nest so that people bored with playing Fortnite or watching old re-runs of TV shows that weren't that great first time round can now fill their waking hours watching a Curlew sat motionless on a nest hoping to catch the once every few hours change-over!</span></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Lcj53IZFHsk/XraFKRaPJUI/AAAAAAAADsY/UJ-CQ52x70gCGAhkkxkMo3DBIQHM401nACLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Curlew%2BCam%2B2020.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="397" data-original-width="723" height="350" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Lcj53IZFHsk/XraFKRaPJUI/AAAAAAAADsY/UJ-CQ52x70gCGAhkkxkMo3DBIQHM401nACLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Curlew%2BCam%2B2020.jpg" width="640" /></a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>Female curlew on Curlew Country's Curlew Cam 2020</i></span></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">This year's camera is on a nest where both adults have&nbsp;previous.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The male (YELLOW BI) was ringed at Dolydd Hafren on 6th August 2015. Unusually he is known to have nested for two years at a nearby territory (about 2km distant) before moving to the current territory near Church Stoke, Powys, where this is his third nesting attempt in three years (all these last three nests were fenced by Curlew Country and all produced hatched chicks. We cannot be 100% sure but we think at least one or two of the resulting chicks fledged successfully). This male is a bit of an A-lister in the Curlew world having starred in an award-winning film by Billy Clapham called <b>Keeper of the Call</b> and appeared on Springwatch in 2019. He is known to winter at Devoran in Cornwall where Mark Grantham has reported seeing him every winter since he was ringed.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-sCNU_L1E5zo/XraGbBjiSKI/AAAAAAAADsk/sRHEbuebUqoSh8ILaw8xpDq1yt6BwJTYACLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/80bb85e6-99c1-449d-8eff-6ca7590f2865.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1268" data-original-width="1600" height="506" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-sCNU_L1E5zo/XraGbBjiSKI/AAAAAAAADsk/sRHEbuebUqoSh8ILaw8xpDq1yt6BwJTYACLcBGAsYHQ/s640/80bb85e6-99c1-449d-8eff-6ca7590f2865.jpg" width="640" /></a></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><br /></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>Male bird on his winter retreat to Cornwall (photo&nbsp;courtesy of Mark Grantham)</i></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The female (YELLOW ID) was also ringed at Dolydd Hafren on 27th March 2017. She is also known to have nested at another territory (some 10km distant) but is not known to have successfully hatched or reared young. She is a new pairing for this male who nested with an unringed bird last year. We do not know where she winters - yet!</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The link for the live video feed will be available for the duration of the incubation and can be viewed on&nbsp;Curlew Country's website at</span><br /><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">&nbsp;<a href="https://curlewcountry.org/curlew-cam-2019/" target="_blank">Curlew Country Curlew Cam 2020</a></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Hopefully things will have eased by the end of the breeding season&nbsp;otherwise the male might not be allowed back to Cornwall this winter!</span></div>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com5tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-17545223603243552702020-04-24T12:03:00.000+01:002020-04-24T18:16:57.427+01:00The welcome return of KFC<div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">No, not a news item about the slackening of Covid-19 restrictions in the takeaway industry.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Thuens Kruger, an avid Sandwich Tern colour-ring reader in South Africa, has just sent me details of Sandwich Tern KFC ringed as a juvenile on autumn passage at Ynyslas in 2016 (shown below) see &nbsp;</span><a href="https://midwalesringers.blogspot.com/2016/08/a-chicken-sandwich.html" style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">https://midwalesringers.blogspot.com/2016/08/a-chicken-sandwich.html</a></div><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif; margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ePlhNvtfuvA/V6cMtGCiyOI/AAAAAAAADU0/R_lHRURFboEjVVnpYX0SNwT9nRAJWf8vgCPcBGAYYCw/s1600/SANTE%2BKFC.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1061" data-original-width="1600" height="424" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ePlhNvtfuvA/V6cMtGCiyOI/AAAAAAAADU0/R_lHRURFboEjVVnpYX0SNwT9nRAJWf8vgCPcBGAYYCw/s640/SANTE%2BKFC.jpeg" width="640" /></a></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">After a 3 year absence it was re-sighted at Eersterivier mouth, Macassar, South Africa on 7th Jan 2020 and 12th Feb 2020 and then again at Greenways, Strand, South Africa on 14th Feb 2020.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-m-b65SMLxqY/XqLCG1zvJtI/AAAAAAAADsE/2sZZA0zkHwk-iVAprVIJLs8dR2IR22oZQCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Sandwich%2BTern%2B%2BR-KFC%2B%2BMacassar%2B%2B07-01-2020.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="800" data-original-width="1200" height="426" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-m-b65SMLxqY/XqLCG1zvJtI/AAAAAAAADsE/2sZZA0zkHwk-iVAprVIJLs8dR2IR22oZQCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Sandwich%2BTern%2B%2BR-KFC%2B%2BMacassar%2B%2B07-01-2020.JPG" width="640" /></a><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9E-3h-DCs2Y/XqLCHI0N9vI/AAAAAAAADsI/I4IHqlnqyBcIIL_61m6Ykqk6vMxu4hqywCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Ring%2B%2BR-KFC.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="703" data-original-width="703" height="320" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9E-3h-DCs2Y/XqLCHI0N9vI/AAAAAAAADsI/I4IHqlnqyBcIIL_61m6Ykqk6vMxu4hqywCLcBGAsYHQ/s320/Ring%2B%2BR-KFC.JPG" width="320" /></a></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Neither photo is his best work but both certainly good enough and absolutely no doubt about the ring inscription, he also managed repeat sightings of KAL and KNB too. Really good to hear KFC is still going - waiting on news of its namesake now!</span></div>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-76508611211889634622020-04-20T14:26:00.001+01:002020-04-20T14:26:22.618+01:00What a Twite!<div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-upyPoxaPMoo/Xp2g3jrl2gI/AAAAAAAADrs/1ihHDtAOD5oEzdARrc_7A-fStDBxdtdOACLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/IMG_5891.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1600" data-original-width="1200" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-upyPoxaPMoo/Xp2g3jrl2gI/AAAAAAAADrs/1ihHDtAOD5oEzdARrc_7A-fStDBxdtdOACLcBGAsYHQ/s640/IMG_5891.jpg" width="480" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><i>One of the 8 Twite ringed at Ynyslas on 26th November 2018 - the first ever in Ceredigion</i></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">On 26th November 2018, at one of our regular ringing sites next to Ynyslas NNR, I caught my first ever Twite in over 35 years ringing there. In fact I caught my first ever 8 Twite! One of our then trainees, Ed O'Connor, had found the small flock, the largest seen in Ceredigion for a good many years, a week or two earlier. At my request he had pre-baited the site for a few days whilst we waited for some calmer weather for netting. On the off chance I had asked Kelvin Jones if he would mind sending me a few of his North Wales Twite colour-ring combinations in case we were successful. In a stroke of sheer fortune Kelvin was down in Mid Wales from his more usual North Wales haunts that very evening and I arranged to meet him on his way home to pick some up - hardly expecting they would actually be needed. The following morning we set a couple of 40ft single shelf mist-nets amongst the weed seeds and waited. A few Reed Buntings, Linnets and Chaffinches later Ed saw the small flock fly in off the saltmarsh and land immediately in front of the nets right by the sound lure. A casual saunter towards the nets was all that was needed to push the whole flock&nbsp;straight into the single shelf.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">This morning, in what is the best lock-down lightener I had for a good few weeks, I received an email from Kelvin to say that one of them had just been photographed on the Isle of Skye, 575 km NNW! What an amazing result and a clear example of the added benefits of colour-rings.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-53Rtn5GUmW8/Xp2fxU-DOuI/AAAAAAAADrk/YUvkM92Ctb8Zy7mfHgbTGg42mKefackwgCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Twite4%2B%25281%2Bof%2B1%2529.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="674" data-original-width="674" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-53Rtn5GUmW8/Xp2fxU-DOuI/AAAAAAAADrk/YUvkM92Ctb8Zy7mfHgbTGg42mKefackwgCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Twite4%2B%25281%2Bof%2B1%2529.jpg" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-b6X5Yk_ZOX8/Xp2h82i7tmI/AAAAAAAADr0/j2d5c1EdmlQJuLPElO1fere-y_JKRwG_QCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Screenshot%2B2020-04-20%2B13.47.14.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1265" data-original-width="1171" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-b6X5Yk_ZOX8/Xp2h82i7tmI/AAAAAAAADr0/j2d5c1EdmlQJuLPElO1fere-y_JKRwG_QCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Screenshot%2B2020-04-20%2B13.47.14.png" width="592" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com3tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-3842063003816974732020-03-22T14:59:00.000+00:002020-03-22T14:59:05.283+00:00Not well Choughed!<div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">In September we had a report that two of our colour-ringed Choughs had been re-sighted near Settle in the Yorkshire Dales the first Choughs sighted in Yorkshire for 25 years! The birds were siblings from a brood ringed on North Anglesey in June 2019. Although they were siblings, they were a male and female and could possibly have bred in Yorkshire if they had survived to two years old or more, re-colonising an area that they used to inhabit but haven't bred in for well over 100 years. Unfortunately that isn't going to happen as the young male has just been found dead (no obvious cause). A very sad end indeed.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-S7-3-uaHg1A/Xnd5jd066jI/AAAAAAAADrU/aP83WVHptKkJVUpEK3zGny6-vZX-FiJhQCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/image001.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1270" data-original-width="602" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-S7-3-uaHg1A/Xnd5jd066jI/AAAAAAAADrU/aP83WVHptKkJVUpEK3zGny6-vZX-FiJhQCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/image001.jpg" width="302" /></a></div><br />Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-2771948742089586682020-03-08T21:58:00.000+00:002020-03-08T21:58:47.506+00:00Baby come back<div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-UA8jwpMrQUI/XmVmDm9JOOI/AAAAAAAADqQ/0xL0tQBAdYMW7Dfpe4crvROu_qKOIpxJACLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Curlew%2Bchick%2B9A.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em; text-align: center;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1328" data-original-width="747" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-UA8jwpMrQUI/XmVmDm9JOOI/AAAAAAAADqQ/0xL0tQBAdYMW7Dfpe4crvROu_qKOIpxJACLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Curlew%2Bchick%2B9A.jpg" width="360" /></a></div><br /><br /><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">In 2016 and 2017 we had a brief spell working with the Powys Moorland Partnership monitoring their small Lapwing and Curlew breeding population. The above Curlew chick is the only one we ever managed to colour-ring there. It was ringed on 4th July 2017 near Ireland Moor by Jacques and myself after an epic stint trying to located it from a car some distance off. The main problem was it was highly mobile and every time we spotted it by the time we could run to where it was seen it had bunked off through a dense cover of bracken and hidden. Anyway patience and perseverance finally delivered and three years on we get the rewards of all the effort as it has just been re-sighted (and photographed) at Llangorse Lake by Mark Waldron. </span></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-rpbV4z4a0nY/XmVnrWj-8XI/AAAAAAAADqc/LZSeWoiYW18NMiMtf1bqOmj6j4dxLoYugCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Curlew%2B-%2BLlangorse%2BLake%252C%2B7.3.20%2BBlack%2B9A%2B%25281%2529%2B2.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1521" data-original-width="1600" height="608" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-rpbV4z4a0nY/XmVnrWj-8XI/AAAAAAAADqc/LZSeWoiYW18NMiMtf1bqOmj6j4dxLoYugCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Curlew%2B-%2BLlangorse%2BLake%252C%2B7.3.20%2BBlack%2B9A%2B%25281%2529%2B2.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Judging by the bill length it is almost certainly a female and she is likely heading inland to the very hills she was reared in to hopefully try and rear chicks of her own for the first time. Fingers crossed she succeeds, we need all the young Curlews we can get.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-6392567173891686402020-02-02T21:38:00.000+00:002020-02-03T21:36:33.586+00:00A little bit of magic...<div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">After several nights up on the hills trapping and ringing 'our' wintering waders, Silvia and I decided to head to the coast to try for some different waders at another one of our wader ringing sites. The first night we went out we weren't really too sure what would be there so we didn't bother to ask Tony for colour-rings, which was a real<span style="background-color: yellow;"></span> shame because we managed to trap and ring 4 Redshank and 2 Oystercatcher - both of which we colour-ring. We also caught 11(+1) Turnstone, which we are hoping to get a similar colour-ringing project on the go as we seem to have found a more effective way of trapping them. Either that or there's just a lot more about, but whichever it is, it would be great to get some re-sightings of them.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">The second night, we made sure we had enough of each colour-ring and made the trip down to the coast again. There were still plenty of birds there, but they were proving a lot harder to catch. By the end of the night we were actually a little disappointed having only caught 2 Golden Plover, 1 Redshank and 2 Turnstone (this was a good catch, but we just had our hopes set a little higher after the catch from the night before). Walking back to the car a little deflated, I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw a small bird of prey sat in the field. It was a MERLIN!! After a couple of short flights, I dropped the net on it and slowly came to terms with what had just happened!!!</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">As Tony was ringing just up the road, I asked if he could quickly drop a colour-ring off for it - th<span style="background-color: white;">is </span>was one of the few we didn't have with us!! By the time we were back at the car, Tony was there with the colour-ring.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Going by the size (wing 213, weight 182) and plumage of the bird it seemed like an obvious juvenile female, but after looking a bit closer at some of the plumage details I wondered if it could possibly be a juvenile Icelandic race Merlin - I'm still waiting to hear back from some people who are more familiar with these birds.</span></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9BCN9aPswwo/Xjc4_rTSZOI/AAAAAAAACQI/6_Jhaai344kVlTI_jgWz0X9a_tGr7JuZACEwYBhgL/s1600/Merlin.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1384" data-original-width="1600" height="552" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9BCN9aPswwo/Xjc4_rTSZOI/AAAAAAAACQI/6_Jhaai344kVlTI_jgWz0X9a_tGr7JuZACEwYBhgL/s640/Merlin.jpg" width="640" /></a></div><br /><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">With no trees anywhere near, I placed the bird on a nearby post and waited for it to fly off to find it's own roost place for the night. It's going to take a lot to top that!!</span></div>Paul Leafehttp://www.blogger.com/profile/13889142484894303857noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-14586586086626452512019-11-19T13:00:00.001+00:002019-11-20T11:42:35.078+00:00The long and the short of it...<div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Last night Tony and I headed out to try to mist net some owls that he had seen a week or so ago near one of his ringing sites. We would have gone sooner to try for them, but as is normally the case in mid Wales, we had to wait for a calm night! We got to the site, set up a couple of nets with lures placed underneath them and waited! With not much happening we were thinking of packing up, but gave it 10 more minutes, then all of a sudden an 'eared' Owl was flying around the net! Bingo, in it went. I 'ran' over to the net, and could see that it was a Long-eared Owl (which was odd because we were using a Short-eared Owl lure). This however, turned out to be the one that Tony had caught a few nights ago. Nevertheless, it was still great to see in the hand!</span></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-26r3jgYnJ3Y/XdPk1N5nPNI/AAAAAAAACOg/--3Od1nl1K017rWUBfpdtMtlvo7iPN5IwCNcBGAsYHQ/s1600/IMG_5955.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1600" data-original-width="1318" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-26r3jgYnJ3Y/XdPk1N5nPNI/AAAAAAAACOg/--3Od1nl1K017rWUBfpdtMtlvo7iPN5IwCNcBGAsYHQ/s640/IMG_5955.jpg" width="524" /></a></div><br /><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">We decided to leave the nets for a bit longer, but, after nothing was seen for quite a while we decided to call it a day and take the nets down. On his way to the net, Tony could see another owl in there, so (like a cheetah in peak condition) he sprinted over and managed to get to it before it escaped. This time we had caught what we were trying for - a cracking Short-eared Owl.</span></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8TJWXBlbJag/XdPmneqWAyI/AAAAAAAACO0/uLDgVdS_PZwBtRotCCsq8FFXg8YnqUOhgCNcBGAsYHQ/s1600/IMG_5961.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1465" data-original-width="1600" height="586" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8TJWXBlbJag/XdPmneqWAyI/AAAAAAAACO0/uLDgVdS_PZwBtRotCCsq8FFXg8YnqUOhgCNcBGAsYHQ/s640/IMG_5961.jpg" width="640" /></a></div><br /><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As if that wasn't enough, while I was out ringing Woodcock on Sunday night a Short-eared Owl decided it was going to chase one of the Woodcock that I was trying to catch. It disappeared out of site so I quickly put the call of Meadow Pipit on my speaker, and sure enough it came back to investigate! </span></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/--mB2x3N_15U/XdPlnBOplbI/AAAAAAAACOo/wokLaApkJD883yOEgeRGDy3T9HExNQTwACNcBGAsYHQ/s1600/IMG_5940.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1527" data-original-width="1600" height="610" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/--mB2x3N_15U/XdPlnBOplbI/AAAAAAAACOo/wokLaApkJD883yOEgeRGDy3T9HExNQTwACNcBGAsYHQ/s640/IMG_5940.jpg" width="640" /></a> </div><br /><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Hopefully we will get some more calm nights, as there seems to have been a small influx of Short-eared Owls (at least in our area).</span></div>Paul Leafehttp://www.blogger.com/profile/13889142484894303857noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-41230744988573248692019-11-04T20:56:00.001+00:002019-11-04T20:56:56.318+00:00Ynyslas NNR exporting plastic to Africa!<div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Two recent examples as to why Wales exporting plastic to Africa may not be the terrible act it sounds!</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">A couple of emails today showed the huge value to be gained from adding just a very small amount of plastic to migratory birds caught for ringing. The first, from Marcelo Cabrera, contained details (and a couple of confirmatory photos) of a juvenile Dunlin ringed at Ynyslas on 17th August 2019 and found on 2nd and 3rd of November on the North coast of Fuerteventura, Canary Islands (OK, so its Spain officially but its Africa geographically). As far as I can see this is perhaps only the 2nd recorded movement of a BTO-ringed Dunlin to the Canary Islands. We have also recently received sightings in Morocco of two other Dunlin ringed at Ynyslas this autumn.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-upS05tUcs94/XcCHczgZrhI/AAAAAAAADow/sdpv76UM3s0p24NSPwDYEPsehLzPKlrEQCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Dunlin%2B-%2BMajanicho%2B-%2BMarcelo%2BCabrera%2B%25281%2529.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="960" data-original-width="1280" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-upS05tUcs94/XcCHczgZrhI/AAAAAAAADow/sdpv76UM3s0p24NSPwDYEPsehLzPKlrEQCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Dunlin%2B-%2BMajanicho%2B-%2BMarcelo%2BCabrera%2B%25281%2529.jpeg" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-svJKKJB5JMw/XcCQbFyvcdI/AAAAAAAADpc/i-VHrwPB-g80fHvu1kfmIxz2BiE2V0CnQCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Screenshot%2B2019-11-04%2B20.54.49.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1050" data-original-width="902" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-svJKKJB5JMw/XcCQbFyvcdI/AAAAAAAADpc/i-VHrwPB-g80fHvu1kfmIxz2BiE2V0CnQCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Screenshot%2B2019-11-04%2B20.54.49.png" width="548" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Then, this evening, I had an email from Theuns Kruger who had just photographed Sandwich Tern Red KAL for the third successive winter at The Strand, Western Cape, South Africa. This bird was ringed at Ynyslas as a juvenile, on passage, in August 2013 and has been a regular at Dawlish warren in Devon but we are still yet to discover where it is breeding.</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nh3ssCEsL4E/XcCHo-YkvAI/AAAAAAAADo0/cep2-SrEaRo03MUqqclXELzVsBeYA37IgCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Sandwich%2BTern%2B%2BR-KAL%2B%2BStrand%2B%2BRSA%2B%2B04-11-2019%2BA.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="800" data-original-width="1200" height="426" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nh3ssCEsL4E/XcCHo-YkvAI/AAAAAAAADo0/cep2-SrEaRo03MUqqclXELzVsBeYA37IgCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Sandwich%2BTern%2B%2BR-KAL%2B%2BStrand%2B%2BRSA%2B%2B04-11-2019%2BA.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-5ZclvhmwGP4/XcCOl2MTchI/AAAAAAAADpQ/sXjzkaMOM0IeQpo_AVw4w8gIcTV9YpQQgCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/Screenshot%2B2019-11-04%2B20.47.32.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="676" data-original-width="1531" height="282" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-5ZclvhmwGP4/XcCOl2MTchI/AAAAAAAADpQ/sXjzkaMOM0IeQpo_AVw4w8gIcTV9YpQQgCLcBGAsYHQ/s640/Screenshot%2B2019-11-04%2B20.47.32.png" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><br />Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-82792000815438760642019-09-10T21:13:00.000+01:002019-09-10T21:13:58.443+01:00Some tidy tides<div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">The last set of high tides at Ynyslas at the end of August/start of September proved pretty amazing as would be expected at this time of the year. Visiting ringers Stephen Harris-Vickers and Kirsty Franklin helped out on all nights along with Paul Roughley on the Saturday and Lee Barber on the Sunday. Sunday night's activities were initially focussed on trying to mist-net and colour-ring a few more Sandwich Terns with a wildlife film-maker filming the procedure for an upcoming documentary on the Dyfi Estuary. However, low numbers of terns present and the slightly stronger than forecast winds meant that this was soon abandoned and catching was once again focussed on dazzling some of the large numbers of small waders passing through the site.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">In total, over the complete set of high tides, 412 new birds and 21 retraps/controls were caught and ringed/processed comprising:-</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Dunlin 279 (+12)</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Ringed Plover 51 (+1)</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Knot 42 (+4)</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Turnstone 16 (+2)</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Sanderling 14 (+2)</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Curlew Sandpiper 4</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Redshank 3</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Bar-tailed Godwit 2&nbsp;</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">and Little Stint 1</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">One of the ringed Dunlin was a Norwegian control and another had been ringed on the Tees Estuary in August this year. One of the unringed Dunlin was a&nbsp;leucistic individual, the first we have ever seen at the site.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-FY_R4WN-8nI/XXgA68DEnoI/AAAAAAAADoE/T6s3JW2iCIwOqk4xEaZs3YlrjX7sdTZ7ACLcBGAs/s1600/Image-3%2B2.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-FY_R4WN-8nI/XXgA68DEnoI/AAAAAAAADoE/T6s3JW2iCIwOqk4xEaZs3YlrjX7sdTZ7ACLcBGAs/s640/Image-3%2B2.jpeg" width="640" /></a></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><i><br /></i></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><i>&nbsp;Leucistic Dunlin</i></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">We have already been notified that one of the Dunlin has been re-sighted in Spain and one of the Curlew Sandpipers (pictured below) ringed on 30th August had its metal ring read through a telescope at Tacumshin Lake in Co. Wexford, Ireland on 5th September</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-6htuH0D0HkM/XXgBbJNH-LI/AAAAAAAADoM/XFyiXnWNGWoSCxWJal6wxOKXgBvpqUFqACLcBGAs/s1600/Image-4.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-6htuH0D0HkM/XXgBbJNH-LI/AAAAAAAADoM/XFyiXnWNGWoSCxWJal6wxOKXgBvpqUFqACLcBGAs/s640/Image-4.jpeg" width="640" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-u9anQffrsuQ/XXgCCT9anvI/AAAAAAAADoU/HoxCGgySI3gTXSdBzg3uxCH2r2gGr0MKQCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_2621.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-u9anQffrsuQ/XXgCCT9anvI/AAAAAAAADoU/HoxCGgySI3gTXSdBzg3uxCH2r2gGr0MKQCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_2621.JPG" width="640" /></a></div><div><br /></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><i>The same Curlew Sandpiper photographed on 30th August at Ynyslas and on 5th September in Co. Wexford (in company with a Semi-palmated Sandpiper!!)</i></span></div>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-45510185760614916292019-08-20T23:12:00.001+01:002019-08-28T16:16:47.889+01:00Knot a bad catch...<div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Over the last 4 nights, Tony and myself (with help from Silvia, Ben, Paul Roughley and Paul Ashworth) have gone to one of our regular wader ringing sites on the west coast to trap and colour-ring, migrating Dunlin as they are pushed up the beach during the high tides. Although the tides weren't as high as we'd have like, and the added disturbance from the full moon, we actually managed to trap a good number of birds. A total of 302 new Dunlin were ringed. We also added colour-rings to a Portuguese and a Norwegian ringed bird, plus a bird that we caught back in 2015 (this was before we started colour-ringing them). We also caught a Spanish-ringed Dunlin that already had it's own set of colour-rings.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-337vODkxuvA/XVxt7oxjNGI/AAAAAAAACN0/j3WqvIc914Q52BQCQmCe0DB9clpfxwVowCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_5246.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-337vODkxuvA/XVxt7oxjNGI/AAAAAAAACN0/j3WqvIc914Q52BQCQmCe0DB9clpfxwVowCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_5246.JPG" width="640" /></span></a></div><div style="text-align: center;"><div style="text-align: center;"><i><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">(the Portuguese-ringed Dunlin with it's new colour rings)</span></i></div></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><i>&nbsp;</i>&nbsp;</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Given the current number of re-sightings of our colour-ringed Dunlin, I'm hopeful that we will soon have some reports of these birds as they continue to head south for the winter.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">As well as the Dunlin, there were a few other species using the area as a migration stop-off point. Other birds trapped and ringed were 1 Skylark, 1 Common Sandpiper, 8 Sanderling, 26 Turnstone, 17 Ringed Plover and 14 Knot.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-i-I2j6SeIN8/XVxuTLJb_6I/AAAAAAAACN8/sMUH5Fh88TEenhbOAcTZ8EguW-5_JurnACLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_5263.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-i-I2j6SeIN8/XVxuTLJb_6I/AAAAAAAACN8/sMUH5Fh88TEenhbOAcTZ8EguW-5_JurnACLcBGAs/s640/IMG_5263.JPG" width="640" /> </span></a><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><i><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">(One of the Knots that was trapped and ringed - all were Juveniles)</span></i></div>Paul Leafehttp://www.blogger.com/profile/13889142484894303857noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-58089976970440383182019-08-01T15:26:00.003+01:002019-08-01T15:26:59.039+01:00Nobody expects the Spanish in Clocaenog!<div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Occasionally, after trying for Nightjars in the morning we leave the nets up a while to catch a few passerines just to keep our hands in on the smaller stuff. A few days ago in North Wales we did just that and caught a few Phylloscs and Silvia warblers. The last bird out of the net though was a bit special. In nearly 40 years of ringing I've never handled a foreign-ringed Willow Warbler (out of over 2,000 handled) so it was more than a bit unexpected to catch a Spanish-ringed one in such a random way!</span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-W313GRJySPo/XULyxO6nNkI/AAAAAAAADng/sZmldPk8aUIiwWNFWCbFqj3xeFAjQZI6QCLcBGAs/s1600/file1-1.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-W313GRJySPo/XULyxO6nNkI/AAAAAAAADng/sZmldPk8aUIiwWNFWCbFqj3xeFAjQZI6QCLcBGAs/s640/file1-1.jpeg" width="640" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Y9DfymhA5n8/XULycVfNspI/AAAAAAAADnU/m9-BMfnzMr4vnEiFQx7pCiHsUuyrO-aHACLcBGAs/s1600/Spanish%2BWillow%2Bwarbler%2Bring.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1600" data-original-width="1200" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Y9DfymhA5n8/XULycVfNspI/AAAAAAAADnU/m9-BMfnzMr4vnEiFQx7pCiHsUuyrO-aHACLcBGAs/s640/Spanish%2BWillow%2Bwarbler%2Bring.jpeg" width="480" /></a></div>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-72427589059241532862019-08-01T15:24:00.002+01:002019-08-01T15:24:43.100+01:00A great pair of waders<div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Travelling over to Nightjars the other evening we decided to call in on one of our river shingle ringing sites just to see if there were any Little Ringed Plover chicks or Common Sandpipers to ring. After checking a few blank shingle banks we arrived at one where an adult Little Ringed Plover was alarm-calling loudly. Jumping out of the car to see exactly where the noise was coming from I flushed a large brown bird which Ed immediately id'd as a Stone Curlew. Pretty off the usual range and turns out this is the first record for the vice-county.&nbsp;</span></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ED_VZLZC1dc/XUL1TdIAejI/AAAAAAAADnw/I4uk5AvEIN8E32fGOJGrLw2qGqaXur9zQCLcBGAs/s1600/Caersws%2BStone%2BCurlew.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="960" data-original-width="1244" height="492" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ED_VZLZC1dc/XUL1TdIAejI/AAAAAAAADnw/I4uk5AvEIN8E32fGOJGrLw2qGqaXur9zQCLcBGAs/s640/Caersws%2BStone%2BCurlew.jpeg" width="640" /></a></div><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Didn't ring the Stone Curlew (there was little point trying as its movements were a bit random to say the least) but we did eventually locate and ring the two LRP chicks that were the reason for the alarm-calling.</span><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ZnlSILYAM0A/XULynMjQ0II/AAAAAAAADnk/9VnWgDivfFkoTXAovqrS743VH_DylpTpACEwYBhgL/s1600/file-1.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ZnlSILYAM0A/XULynMjQ0II/AAAAAAAADnk/9VnWgDivfFkoTXAovqrS743VH_DylpTpACEwYBhgL/s640/file-1.jpeg" width="640" /></a></div>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-8366015065945733687.post-66128523381668736812019-07-21T18:20:00.000+01:002019-07-21T18:55:50.184+01:00Night-owling - something to grouse about!<div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Been a while since anything got posted so I thought last night's exploits may warrant a resurgence of the blog.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">This time of the year I am usually pretty much nocturnal doing various Nightjar surveys in &nbsp;Mid, North and South Wales. This year is no exception and along with Ed O'Connor I was out at Clocaenog last night trapping and tracking Nightjars to assess the potential impacts of recent wind-farm development. At one nest, found right in the middle of a horribly dense Sitka Spruce plantation by radio-tracking the female, we managed to catch the male and he turned out to be one of the six birds we had fitted GPS trackers to last autumn to discover more about the migration routes of British Nightjars. Annoyingly, two of the trackers we &nbsp;recovered earlier in the year proved to have failed to record any locations - truly gutting given the time, effort and expense lavished on them. Fingers crossed it is 3rd time lucky with this one.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: justify;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9EUsZt5JA7A/XTSYIUhaSEI/AAAAAAAADmc/yl-2PR7oNyAEAjbTmwQgTKpUvypXV0-CACLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_6397.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9EUsZt5JA7A/XTSYIUhaSEI/AAAAAAAADmc/yl-2PR7oNyAEAjbTmwQgTKpUvypXV0-CACLcBGAs/s640/IMG_6397.jpg" width="640" /></span></a></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Whilst thrashing through the near impenetrable spruce trees last week searching for this nest I inadvertently flushed a roosting Long-eared Owl. Well last night, armed with a tape-lure forwarded to me by Ewan Weston, I thought we might fill the quiet mid-night period in Nightjar activity not by sleeping, which would have been the sensible thing to do, but by trying to tape-lure the owl. On walking up to the area I had flushed it from we suddenly heard the unmistakable call of a recently-fledged Long-eared Owlet out in some open ground just adjacent to the plantation and soon managed to catch it with a torch and a landing-net.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-FzsnAdyl0ic/XTSYoOQrztI/AAAAAAAADmo/bJemC8XsfqMv--3PwnSheJfhdB7WKpEiACLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_6599.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="480" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-FzsnAdyl0ic/XTSYoOQrztI/AAAAAAAADmo/bJemC8XsfqMv--3PwnSheJfhdB7WKpEiACLcBGAs/s640/IMG_6599.jpg" width="640" /></a></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>Making itself look as big and frightening as possible is a good&nbsp;defence for this young Long-eared Owl. Was pretty feisty to handle too!</i></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">As if all this wasn't exciting enough out from the heather burst a couple of large game birds and quite instinctively I managed to catch one by hand as it flew past. The bird, which turned out to be a half-grown grouse chick caused us some serious soul-searching, mainly because at that time of night, with no internet access and little previous experience neither of us was sure exactly what it was!! I had originally assumed Red Grouse but then realised that Black Grouse was not out of the question either!! If it was a Red Grouse chick it was large enough to take the recommended F size ring - if it was a Black Grouse chick it wasn't big enough to take the larger G size ring recommended for that species. Two of the primary rules of the ringing scheme are that:-</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">You should only ring a bird if you know what species it is.</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">The safety of the bird comes first.&nbsp;</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/--kbHq2ZxC0s/XTSZbXAS6yI/AAAAAAAADm8/NnUIMxVzxtoS0AkUn4nhHHY_tKQ2-svuQCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_9292.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1600" data-original-width="1200" height="640" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/--kbHq2ZxC0s/XTSZbXAS6yI/AAAAAAAADm8/NnUIMxVzxtoS0AkUn4nhHHY_tKQ2-svuQCLcBGAs/s640/IMG_9292.JPG" width="480" /></a></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i><br /></i></span></div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><i>A 'grouse' chick</i></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">Fitting the wrong size ring to a half-grown chick would be a serious welfare issue so it was released unringed.&nbsp;</span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;"><br /></span></div><div style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: &quot;arial&quot; , &quot;helvetica&quot; , sans-serif;">I have sent some photos to a Grouse expert for confirmation but think we are coming down on the side of Black Grouse at the moment!</span></div>Tony Crosshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/15223532534431871428noreply@blogger.com0